POC US for Shoulder Dislocation

April 27, 2021 By Bri Hartman MD Reviewed by Jonathan Kaplan MD Gottlieb M, Holladay D, Peksa GD. Point-of-care ultrasound for the diagnosis of shoulder dislocation: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Emerg Med. 2019 Apr;37(4):757-761. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2019.02.024. Epub 2019 Feb 19. PMID: 30797607. Introduction and background information Shoulder dislocations are a very common … Continue reading POC US for Shoulder Dislocation

Huffing Away – Toxicology Blog

Author: Jack Bates, PA-C, Emergency Medicine PA ResidentFellow: Alexis Cates, DO, Medical Toxicology Fellow PGY6Faculty: David Goldberger, MD, Medical Toxicology / Emergency Medicine Attending  The Case You are just starting your shift in a community Emergency Department (ED) when a 13 year old girl is brought in by her parents after they found her sleepier … Continue reading Huffing Away – Toxicology Blog

Cute as a Button? – Toxicology Blog

Author: Karen Custodio, DO, Emergency Medicine Resident, PGY-1 Fellow: Richard Chen, MD, Medical Toxicology Fellow, PGY-5 Faculty: James Krueger, MD, Medical Toxicology/Emergency Medicine Attending The Case: You are working a Saturday morning shift at the Emergency Department (ED) in a Philadelphia hospital when a 23-month-old male presents with one episode of hematemesis. The patient attends … Continue reading Cute as a Button? – Toxicology Blog

Inferior vena cava collapsibility detects fluid responsiveness among spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients

Written by Nick Dulin, MD Reviewed by Jonathan Kaplan, MD Corl KA, et al. Inferior vena cava collapsibility detects fluid responsiveness among spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients. J Crit Care. 2017;41:130-137. Full text: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28525778/ BackgroundBoth under and over resuscitation are associated with worsened clinical outcomes in critically ill patients2Assessing fluid status is essential in the management … Continue reading Inferior vena cava collapsibility detects fluid responsiveness among spontaneously breathing critically-ill patients